Sentai Heroine

Vanquishing evil in the name of all things awesome! I'm a 25 year old cis girl (she/her) who identifies as pan-romantic asexual. I'm also INFJ on the Myer-Briggs scale. I'm a huge super sentai/kamen rider fan. I am also in love with actor Sato Takeru and the band One OK Rock. I'm also a feminist. Here you shall find lots of all of that along with posts about dramas and shows that I watch. This blog is basically whatever I feel like posting on the random.  I also consider myself SUPER nice so approach me with whatever. <3 [Art credit to pictolita]
Recent Tweets @HotepGoddess
Who I Follow

crowtrolls:

hetaliangonewild:

wait till the end

#OMF#for people who don#t understand#Today is Thursday and the weather is amazing#But you don’t have a boyfriend#SHUT UP YOU BASTARD#:Y

(via size10plz)

ashtonshugedick:

I honestly want to thank tumblr for making me more culturally aware and educated about what’s going on in the world because without it I’d be getting one sided opinions from blonde news broadcasters left and right and have a completely warped sense of the world

(via themandychronicles)

youngblackandvegan:

theorlandojones:

This is a very serious disease* so I gladly accept the “bucket challenge”

*My heart goes out to all those who struggle with ALS but I am, of course, talking about the disease of apathy.  If (and hopefully when) Michael Brown’s killer is brought to justice and convicted of 1st degree murder, it still won’t prevent this from happening again. We cannot accept this as the status quo. We MUST continue the fight at the ballot box, in the media and by working to create systemic change. I’m not naive to the dirty politics (redistricting, voter ID requirements, etc) that will try to prevent us from our goal. But I refuse to give up hope. My “bullet bucket challenge” is not about pointing fingers and it’s not about being angry. Every shell casing in that bucket represents the life of someone who fought and died in the goal for civil rights and human dignity. As a member of law enforcement (yes I really am a reserve sheriff) I will not stand idly by while others violate civil and human rights under the cover of authority and I will insist that other good cops rise to the same standard as well. As a black man I will demand more from myself and my community. I will not allow outsiders to co-opt our struggle in order to commit violence in our name. I’m channeling my outrage into action so I no longer feel powerless. It’s not about black or white. It’s not about rich or poor. It’s about us vs. them. There are more of us — from all races, genders and identities — then there will ever be of them. And we will be victorious”

"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality"

Join me.

powerful

(via cuntofdoom)

yogenhara:

2014 TVガイド dan vol.2 SUMMER_Fukushi sota

(via duckiesandlemons)

clannyphantom:

drunktrophywife:

girlwhowasonfire:

shitangiggle:

girlwhowasonfire:

Petition to ban old men from writing books just because they don’t know how to use an iPhone

Petition to have the youth in this country to actually educate themselves instead of spitting out some bullshit they read on some shitty post on facebook that’s untrue, and continues to spread like wildfire.

In 2012, young adults have set the record of completing both high school and college and are on course to become the most educated generation in America history. Maybe you should follow the example of ‘the youth in this country’ and do the same.

And research suggests that all the “damn texting” we do is leading us to be more social and creating stronger bonds with more ppl so

"you can communicate with people across the world instantly?? this generation is terrible!!"

(via size10plz)

  • me: *watches new episode of favorite show*
  • me: *proceeds to reblog 924 posts of said episode*

nevvzealand:

i dont understand how i can get so much joy from covering my pets with blankets and watching the lump move around

(via size10plz)

super sentai ships [18/25] - souji/ian

(via yuutolovesturtles)

YEAH! A lot of people i toku fell in water while being unconscious and still end up being saved! So no body? Still totally alive. Water is not dangerous in toku
juenofhotep juenofhotep Said:

Bingo. Water death =/= actual death

Water death is temporary.

No body? Not dead.

This is not denial it is FACT! (I could be so far in denial with everything it’s insane but yeah, it’s not over until it’s over…and even if Gaim ends unless I get official confirmation I’m just going to believe Takatora was in a coma and in some shack and then awoke several months after the end of the show.)

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).

In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.

In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.

So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.

I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.

Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

(via size10plz)

illbeoutback:

If you’re protesting abortion, the Supreme Court says you can get right in women’s faces and scream at them on their way into the clinic. Because freedom of speech.

But if you try and protest the murder of a black man, you get tear gas fired at you.

(via glassreflection)

smoothiefreak:

I don’t know how to tell my White friends how I’m feeling this week…

I don’t know how to explain how having cops around has never made me feel safer, but rather, more likely to die that day.

That I worry that I will be shot for being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

That the last statement is not hyperbole. 

That the NYPD might come to the wrong apartment and due to the lack of repercussions, have no problem gunning me down followed by the media tarnishing my name. 

I don’t know how to explain that the reason I don’t fear death is because of things like this—because it can happen to any of us at any time.

I don’t know how to tell my good friends that championing for less-strict gun legislation inevitably means more racial injustice.

I don’t know how to tell my White friends that this is the reality of romanticizing the 40s/50s/60s.

I don’t know how to tell my White friends that I cried this week thinking of my 4 year old nephew and how his mother’s Stanford pedigree will not protect him from the countless people who want to hurt him simply because of the color of his skin.

I don’t know how to explain the overwhelming sense of pride I had being asked to host this week’s episode of Mental Floss on YouTube as substitute for the John Green and subsequently being torn to shreds by racists in the comments section because my “nose is HUUUUUUGE” and having people “turn off the video when I saw it was a Black woman.”

I don’t know what it will take for people to stop acting as if racism ended after slavery/in the 60s/with Obama’s election/when they got a Black friend, etc., etc.,

I don’t know how to make people understand the weight of growing up in a society that thinks you inherently are suspicious.

That being brown means I’m a target and that that’s just okay with everyone.

I don’t know how my White friends will ever empathize with the level of exhaustion I feel from simply trying to help them understand.

I am exhausted.

I don’t know how to explain how alleged shoplifting only results in death for Black bodies.

And how the false equivalence is so easy for some people to make.

I don’t know how to make the people who romanticize dystopian fiction realize that they have no right to turn a blind eye when it is a reality for so many people.

I don’t know how to be my usual funny, upbeat self when I am just. so. tired.

I don’t know how to not cross the line of being socially aware and being an “angry Black woman” when at the end of the day, I am actually very angry.

I don’t know how to explain to deaf ears that racism still exists in glaring ways that affect me every minute of every day.

I’m really sorry I’ve been absent this week. I don’t know…

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